Monthly Archives: October 2015

Coming to Calarco: October 2015

coming soon

Keep an eye out for these new and noteworthy books.

Fiction

Fates and Furies -Lauren Groff

A Window Opens -Elisabeth Egan

Best Boy -Eli Gottlieb

Still Life -Louise Penny

The Tsar of Love and Techno: Stories -Anthony Marra

Eileen -Ottessa Moshfegh

Everybody Rise -Stephanie Clifford

Undermajordomo Minor -Patrick deWitt

Quicksand -Steve Toltz

Girl with a Pearl Earring -Tracy Chevalier

Animal Dreams -Barbara Kingsolver

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena -Anthony Marra

The Sportswriter -Richard Ford

YA Fiction

The Invasion of the Tearling -Erika Johansen (sequel to The Queen of the Tearling)

All the Bright Places -Jennifer Niven

The Young Elites -Marie Lu

The Rose Society -Marie Lu (sequel to The Young Elites)

The Rest of Us Just Live Here -Patrick Ness

The Sleeper and the Spindle -Neil Gaiman

Dumplin’ -Julie Murphy

Another Day -David Levithan (companion to Every Day)

Nightfall -Jake Halpern

Darius & Twig -Walter Dean Myers

Fake ID -Lamar Giles

Fairest: Levana’s Story -Marissa Meyer (a Lunar Chronicles book)

Habibi -Naomi Shihab Nye

More Happy Than Not -Adam Silvera

Everything, Everything -Nicola Yoon

Non-Fiction

Ordinary Light: A Memoir -Tracy K. Smith

Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsburg and the Secret History of the Vietnam War -Steve Sheinkin

The Billion Dollar Spy -David E. Hoffman

I’m Fine -Emily Wang (stories by one of Hopkins’ very own!)

Fire Shut Up in My Bones -Charles M. Blow (memoir)

The Art of Memoir -Mary Karr

Kafka: The Decisive Years -Reiner Stach

Steve Jobs -Walter Isaacson

The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir -Bill Bryson

Graphic Novels

Nimona -Noelle Stevenson

This One Summer -Mariko Tamaki

Go see The Martian (Movie Review)

It was a given that Ms. Barrows and I were going to go see The Martian, Ridley Scott’s multi-million dollar blockbuster film that was released this past weekend.

See, Mr. Gette and myself have been captivated by Andy Weir’s novel since we read it over a year ago during the 2014 March break (as made evident by our texts during that short but exciting period in our reading lives). We proselytized for this book for months. We put it on display. We recommended it to everyone who so much as looked at the library. We did not shut up about it at the lunch table. We were insufferable.

When Bookriot announced The Martian was opted and being made into a film, we were ecstatic. When we saw the teaser trailer and found out Matt Damon would be playing the titular character, we ran victory laps on the lower level of the library, high-fived everyone in the vicinity, and threw books in the air while Queen’s We Are The Champions played in the background. It was, to say the least, a celebratory moment in our reading lives.

But we balked – we were hesitant. We should have been the ones who were first in line for the midnight showing. But we weren’t. We were…afraid. Book-to-movie adaptations are almost never successful. And when they are successful, book fans must respect the film enough to accept it as a different entity. But then the reviews started coming in (93% on Rotten Tomatoes!). By Saturday, we were both in the theater. And thus, here is our review.

IT’S SO GOOD SO GOOD SO GOOD.

Ahem. But really, SO GOOD.

so-good

JG: They got the tone just right. One of the best parts of the book is how funny it is, and i was worried that would be lost in the pursuit of super-serious-suspenseful-space…movie. And it does have its serious moments, but the jokes are still there. I haven’t laughed this hard in a theater in a long time. And oh man, is it a beautiful movie. I give it five Martian Potatoes.

JB: To rip off the Wired review, the movie is the book with better editing. Those who read Weir’s book will remember the paragraphs upon paragraphs of science-y, engineer-y text. With the help of visuals and, well, better editing, those descriptions are pared down. When Matt Damon looks into the vlog and does describe science, it is always funny and fascinating. I didn’t expect the film to have moving and/or serious and/or touching moments. But it did. And they were, to be repetitive, SO GOOD. If you can, take the time/money to see The Martian in a 3D IMAX theater. It felt like you were on Mars with Mark Watney, harvesting martian potatoes and kicking science butt. I give it 5 stars (harhar, space joke).

If you need any more encouraging, watch this:

it's over

-Signing off, Steely-eyed rocket man (James Gette and Jenny Barrows)