Tag Archives: Fiction

Sneak Peek: YA to Watch for in 2016

Before reading this post, it is important to note two things:

  1. These books are in no particular order (other than alphabetical, by author’s last name). They are not ordered by release date OR genre. Some of them do not have a hard release date…just a guestimate (or guestiDATE).
  2. There is loads of YA bookish “coming soon” news on the interwebs. I tried to glean the best of the best, but I had no method of doing that other than using my librarian brain.

Here we go! As determined by Librarian Barrows, the most anticipated YA fiction on the 2016 horizon. All books are linked to their respective Goodreads pages.

Glass Sword (Red Queen #2), by Victoria Aveyard

Bookishly Ever After, by Isabel Bandeira

Passenger, by Alexandra Bracken

The Crown (The Selection #5), by Kierra Cass

A Study in Charlotte, by Brittany Cavallaro

Lady Midnight, by Cassandra Clare

The Fever Code (The Maze Runner #0.6), by James Dashner

The Land of 10,000 Madonnas, by Kate Hattemer

The Love that Split the World, by Emily Henry

Bright Smoke, Cold Fire, by Rosamund Hodge

We Are the Ants, by Shaun David Hutchinson

Exit, Pursued by a Bear, by E.K. Johnston

Rebel, Bully, Geek Pariah, by Erin Jade Lange

Untitled (Young Elites #3), by Marie Lu

Heartless, by Marissa Meyer

Stars Above, by Marissa Meyer

The Mystery of Hollow Places, by Rebecca Podos

The Shadow Queen, by CJ Redwine

Riders, by Veronica Rossi

Calamity, by Brandon Sanderson

The Raven King, by Maggie Stiefvater

The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love, by Sarvenaz Tash

Into the Dim, by Janet B. Taylor

The Muse of Nightmares, by Laini Taylor

My Name is not Friday, by Jon Walter

P.S. I Like You, by Kasie West

The Last Star, by Rick Yancey

And finally…an anthology of YA goodness!

Summer Days & Summer Nights: Twelve Love Stories, featuring stories by:Leigh Bardugo, Francesca Lia Block, Libba Bray, Cassandra Clare, Brandy Colbert, Tim Federle, Lev Grossman, Nina LaCour, Stephanie Perkins, Veronica Roth, Jon Skovron, and Jennifer E. Smith

 

 

New Fiction News, December 2015

We’ve added a bunch of great new books to the Calarco Library fiction (and graphic novels!) sections in December. Completely new titles, sequels to popular stories, mythology mashups, podcast spin-offs – there’s a little bit of everything. You can browse many of them below, or take a look through the Calarco Library Catalog. Clicking on a cover will take you to the record for that book.

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New Fiction News for November 2015

Hello readers!

We went on a bit of a tear, adding over 50 new books to our fiction collection in the past month. You can browse many of them below, or take a look through the Calarco Library Catalog. Clicking on a cover will take you to the record for that book.

The Blue Guitar, by John Banville   tlccontent (1)   tlccontent (2)   tlccontent (2)

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New Books News: Spring Edition

The Calarco Library has kept busy this spring finding new books for the Hopkins community. Check out the list of recent editions below or visit the library catalog to find a specific title.

*A friendly reminder: Calarco Library rents Kindles to staff, faculty and students alike with full access to our 600+ e-book collection. If you would like to check out a Kindle, stop by the library at any time!

Coming to Calarco: November Edition

coming soon

 

 

 

Keep an eye out for these new and noteworthy books.

Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future -by A.S. King

Alan Turing: The Enigma -by Andrew Hodges

(the book that inspired the upcoming film The Imitation Game)

Midwinter Blood -by Marcus Sedgwick

The 5th Wave -Rick Yancey

The Eye of Minds -by James Dashner

Belzhar -by Meg Wolitzer

The Rithmatist -by Brandon Sanderson

Revival -by Stephen King

The Children Act -by Ian McEwan

The Strange Library -by Haruki Murakami

Here, Bullet -by Brian Turner

Without You, There Is No Us: My Time with the Sons of North Korea’s Elite -by Suki Kim

My Life as a Foreign Country -by Brian Turner

The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books -by Azar Nafisi

New Books News

Welcome to New Books News, a semi-regular column featuring new additions to the Calarco Library. This fall, we are highlighting some popular new items as well as books that should be popular, but aren’t getting very much play.

For a full list of new books, please visit Calarco’s What’s New LibGuide.

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Fiction

The Goblin Emperor -Katherine Addison

Need convincing? Read Mr. Gette’s book review.

The Magician’s Land -Lev Grossman

EVERYONE thinks this book is the best installment in Grossman’s trilogy. Need convincing? Read the NYT review.

Ancillary Sword -Ann Leckie

A sequel to Ancillary Justice (which won all the awards).

We Were Liars -E. Lockhart

John Green gave Lockhart’s newest book his stamp of approval. Last time Green did that, it was Eleanor & Park. The guys is usually right.

Station Eleven -Emily St. John Mandel

A National Book Award finalist

The Winter People -Jennifer McMahon

Ghosts + Vermont farmhouses + creepiness = a promising story

Clariel: The Lost Abhorsen -Garth Nix

Fans of the Old Kingdom series will be quick to read this prequel. Interested in starting the series? Check out the Nix’s other installments.

Lock In -John Scalzi

Check out Mr. Gette’s book review. The short version is, “This book is awesome.”

Nora Webster -Colm Toibin

This guy is such a heavyweight that it is always worth checking out his latest book.

The Paying Guests -Sarah Waters

After reading The Little Stranger, I’m ready to read anything by Waters.

Frog Music -Emma Donoghue

If you loved Room, you should give Donoghue’s new (and very different) book a try.

Everything Rick Riordan

Graphic Novels

Smile -Raina Telgemeier

Sisters -Raina Telgemeier

Follow Raina’s story in this graphic novel series.

Book Review: Before I Go To Sleep

before sleep

Christine can remember how to brush her teeth and cook a meal, but she can’t remember most of her life. Sometimes she wakes up as a 20 year-old, other times as a child, but never as the 47 year-old woman she is. During the day, Christine can learn facts about her life and store new memories, but she can’t recall the memories herself. Anything Christine learns or discovers is lost when she goes to sleep. Christine lives in the present, and she is fully dependent on the man she wakes up next to every morning – her husband, Ben. But is Ben telling the whole story? Not long after entering Christine’s reality do we learn that she has been secretly meeting with a doctor, and she has been keeping a private journal. What would a woman with no memory need to hide from the one person she is supposed to trust?

A premise like this, well, it comes cheap. The “trust no one” approach has been rehashed and reused countless times. What makes Watson’s noir a gripping read is his handling of the premise. The reader only knows what Christine knows, and her knowledge fluctuates. The twists to Christine’s story are not out of left-field (a la Gone Girl), but carefully hidden underneath the surface. When Christine discerns a carefully concealed truth, her moments of clarity are reflected in the reader. Sometimes the narration is bogged down when Christine re-remembers parts of her life, but those re-rememberings quickly turn into a narrative tool that propels the story forward.

Final Verdict: The story moves quickly and the plot twists (especially the doozy at the end) are tough to spot.

Read if: you liked Gone Girl and want a story with similar pacing and feel, OR if you hated Gone Girl and want a noir read with plot twists that are actually feasible.

-Signing off, Jenny Barrows (who loves being able to use the word “noir” in a sentence)

New Books News – Game of Thrones Edition

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Greetings Hopkins! The new year brings new things to the Calarco Library Blog. The newest of the new things is New Books News, a quasi-regular column that will highlight recent additions to the library.

A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge. (Tyrion Lannister)

The Calarco Library has long had George R.R. Martin’s incomplete A Song of Ice and Fire series on Kindle; however, we came to realize three things:

  1. Some people might want to read epicly long books in their physical form
  2. Winter is coming…someone might need something to do. The Song of Ice and Fire series certainly qualifies as something to do.
  3. Some of us (including librarians) may have binge watched all four seasons of the Game of Thrones HBO series this summer and may have decided to read all the books before season five comes out in the spring.

So without further ado, we present Martin’s current installments in A Song of Ice and Fire! If you are interested in checking out a copy, simply pay a visit to the upper level of the library or search the library catalog for availability.

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Book Review: The Age of Miracles, by Karen Thompson Walker

Turn, Turn, Turn

The Age of Miracles

They call it the slowing – the unexpected, inexplicable, quietly disastrous deceleration of the earth’s rotation. There are no predictions of its impending occurrence, or Armageddon-esque missions to prevent it – the slowing just happens, and continues to happen. The seemingly ordinary Julia wakes up on an ordinary Saturday after an ordinary sleepover in an ordinary house in an ordinary suburb and hears (along with her ordinary parents) the obviously un-ordinary news that the earth’s rotation on its axis is in fact slowing, and will continue to slow indefinitely.

What makes Karen Thompson Walker’s debut novel quite brilliant is her decision to tell the story of the slowing through the voice of Julia, an 11-year-old girl with parents, a best friend, and two cats. The dichotomy between the extraordinary slowing and the ordinary Julia blurs, merges, overlaps, and swaps places repeatedly throughout Walker’s narrative. Everything from Julia’s best friend and the suburb she calls home, to her parents’ marriage and school bus stop sheds the facade of “ordinary”. Do all things become extraordinary because of the slowing? Does the slowing become ordinary when life is so? Or, can the slowing only be blamed for certain phenomena? Lengthened periods of light and darkness, drastic tide changes, agricultural failures, altered laws of physics, mass extinctions of entire species. Julia herself is never really quite sure.

I mostly enjoyed The Age of Miracles – it couples a coming-of-age story with a sci-fi plot set in a dystopian near-future. Often, there are instances when familiar moral questions are raised – persecution of outsiders (“real timers”), the human impact on planet earth, and the purpose of existence. Conversely, Julia recounts the universally familiar (but perhaps not so grand) personal experiences of middle-school loneliness, first crushes, loss, and marital troubles. Sometimes, I noticed Walker overreaching in her effort to draw parallels between  the microcosm of Julia and the macro phenomenon of the slowing; however, such flaws do not warrant distraction from the promise of this debut novel.

-Signing off, Jenny Barrows (who is confident that she would be a “real timer” if the slowing actually happened….or just a very batty librarian)

Town Forum – Whiteboard Question #1

On Friday, Ms. Barrows and I found an unattended whiteboard in the library. So we decided to put it to use.

Hup two three four

The whiteboard levitates up the stairs.

Less magic, more muscle

Oh wait, it’s just Ms. Barrows.

Since we’re librarians, we have to ask about books. It’s in our contracts. We decided that a nice, easy, non-contentious question to start with would be “Suggest a good book!” And with help from a friendly freshman whose adviser must be wise and talented (Thanks, Nik!), we got set up.

Pretty soon, the whiteboard looked like this:

That was fast!

That was fast!

Seuss. S-E-U-S-S. Seuss.

And then it looked like this:

I've never heard of some of these.

Getting kind of crowded….

And then this:

My eyes! My eyes!

My eyes! My eyes!

Don’t think we didn’t notice that little change, folks. Please respect other people’s recommendations.

Also, The Popcorn Rat? I’m not sure I believe that’s a real book. And Google backs me up on that one.

And finally, at the end of the day:

Hooray!

Hooray!

To keep reading (no, really, keep reading) click here!